Rock Werchter 2008 – Kaiser Chiefs – Half The Truth

Rock Werchter 2008 – Kaiser Chiefs – Half The Truth

Downloadable music scores: Half The Truth (Wilson)

Josh Joyner #28 5’10 185 Junior RB/1st half of the season Highlights

James B. Hunt High School (Wilson, NC) 2011 Big East All-Conference Team 2011 Wilson Daily Times All Area Team – Offensive Player of the Year 2011 stats: 250 carries 1845 yards 26 TD’s. 8 catches 123 yards 1 TD

Why do they never make the bottom of wine bottles flat? They always have the huge indentation that takes away half the bottom. Is there a reason for this?

Downloadable music scores: Half The Truth (Wilson)

When they serve wine to you in fancy restaurant’s, they put their thumb in the bottom of the bottle, I don’t know why. Perhaps tradition?

im not sure but its to do with blowing the bottle at source.um.i think its to do with the cooling process when being made.

If they try to make it flat, but it is bowed just a tiney bot, the bottle will be wobbly. By sucking the middle in, it sits flatter. It also has the lovely effect of makeing the bottle look like ithas more in it that it actually does.

[edit] PuntsA punt, also known as a kick-up, refers to the dimple at the bottom of a wine bottle. There is no consensus explanation for its purpose. The more commonly cited explanations include:[1]it is an historical remnant of old-fashioned glass-blowing techniques; it had the function of making the bottle less likely to topple over — a bottle designed with a flat bottom only needs a small imperfection to make it unstable — the dimple historically allowed for a larger margin of error; it consolidates sediment deposits in a thick ring at the bottom of the bottle, preventing it from being poured into the glass;[7] it allows a bottle of sparkling wine to be turned upside-down and then stacked (depending on its shape); it increases the strength of the bottle, allowing it to hold the high pressure of sparkling wine/champagne; it can make the bottle look bigger, impressing purchasers it holds the bottles in place on pegs of a conveyor belt as they go through the filling process in manufacturing plants; and it accommodates the pourer’s thumb for stability and ease of pouring.

Its called a false bottom. They can make it appear to be a larger amount of wine this way. The same size bottle with a flat bottom would take more wine to fill – its sort of like an optical illusion.

I don’t know if this is the true reason, however, if you have ever seen a server serving wine, that is how they hold the bottle, on the bottom with their fingers in the indentation.

The “punt” was originally designed to catch the lees of the wine (when it wasn’t filtered as well) and it adds a touch of class to it

Aside from giving the waiter a handy place to put his thumb while he serves it, it’s to separate the sediments that gather at the bottom of any wine container and to help they stay in the bottle rather than go in your glass.

For still wines, the punt in the bottle has been there since glass was first blown by hand. A pontil, or wooden stick, was used to secure the bottom of the bottle while the glass blower spun and blew at the neck end. Naturally, the stick indented the bottom of the still molten glass. Today, molded glass bottles do not require the punt, but tradition decrees that it shall be there. You will not find it universally, but almost all fine wine bottles retain the punt.

That indentation is refered to as a punt. here is a description of what and why wine bottles have punts in them.A punt, also known as a kick-up, refers to the dimple at the bottom of a wine bottle. There is no consensus explanation for its purpose. The more commonly cited explanations include:[1]it is an historical remnant of old-fashioned glass-blowing techniques; it had the function of making the bottle less likely to topple over — a bottle designed with a flat bottom only needs a small imperfection to make it unstable — the dimple historically allowed for a larger margin of error; it consolidates sediment deposits in a thick ring at the bottom of the bottle, preventing it from being poured into the glass;[7] it allows a bottle of sparkling wine to be turned upside-down and then stacked (depending on its shape); it increases the strength of the bottle, allowing it to hold the high pressure of sparkling wine/champagne; it can make the bottle look bigger, impressing purchasers it holds the bottles in place on pegs of a conveyor belt as they go through the filling process in manufacturing plants; and it accommodates the pourer’s thumb for stability and ease of pouring

There does exist many bottles that have a near flat bottom.However to the point,1. Stability of strength2. Sedimentation 3. otherpweb.netcom.com/~lachenm/puntFAQ.htmlFor sure the number one reason is to relieve stress on the bottle’s structure. The strength gained by the dimple is best observed in sparkling wines which are under pressure. In manufacture (engineering) of many things it occurs that a crease or dimple relives stress improving that items strength. In addition, it happens to be a remnant of early bottle produce.IV. What is the purpose of the punt?There have been many different explanations proposed on alt.food.wine, and many people are absolutely certain that their explanation is the only correct one. No consensus has been reached on what the true purpose is, or even if there actually is only one “true” explanation for the presence of punts in wine bottles. Here is a list of the proposed explanations, along with some analysis of each one:1. It is a remnant of historical glass-blowing techniques, and serves no real purpose. Punts certainly were a result of historical glass-blowing techniques. The blowpipe was attached to the neck of the bottle, and then it was transferred to a tool called a “punty” (a.k.a. punt, ponty, pontil, pointel, ponto, pontil rod, ponte [7th C.]) which was put on the base of the bottle. An indentation was the natural result (thanks to Dan Razzell for an explanation of old glassblowing techniques). However, whether punts have just survived because of tradition or whether they survived because they have some useful function(s) is still open for debate, as the rest of the list suggests.2. It once had a purpose, which was that it made the bottle more stable when standing up. Hugh Johnson mentions this theory in his book, Vintage, the Story of Wine. Primitive glassblowing did not approach today’s standards of precision. Making a concave surface which will stand on end is much easier than making a flat one, since with just a small manufacturing error, a flat surface can become convex, causing the bottle to tend to tip over, while a concave surface would be just a little less concave and would remain stable. As a result, concerns about stability may have contributed to the development and retention of the punt. This explanation (and the first) are partly supported by the fact that not all of today’s wine bottles have punts; punts are certainly not absolutely necessary in wine bottles now, though they may have been essential in the past.3. It once had (and may still have) a purpose, which was to strengthen the bottle. This explanation supposedly accounts for the deep punts in many sparkling wines. There is at least a grain of truth to this, since early Champagne bottles were weak, and breakage due to pressure was a problem. However, on a previous occasion when this explanation came up, there was a long debate about whether the punt actually contributed significantly to the strength of the bottle. Some people claimed that the weak point in modern bottles is where the base joins the sides, and that a punt would have an insignificant effect on the stability of this region. I haven’t done the calculations on how much a punt would strengthen the base of a bottle myself, but I am somewhat skeptical of the importance of any such effect. (Does anyone want to volunteer to do the calculations, or know of a reliable source where this topic is covered? The reasoning and calculations should address how significant the effect on bottle strength would be, including whether the punt strengthens the weakest point in a modern bottle’s construction — details I have not seen in any arguments to date.)In any event, technology has probably rendered the strength question moot, since modern glass is much stronger than the glass used in early bottles. On alt.food.wine Michael Wilson noted a trend toward shallower punts and thinner glass, making the wine bottles lighter, thus saving shipping costs and increasing profit margins. Apparently, bottle strength is less of an issue than money nowadays. Also, keep in mind that the strength explanation mainly addresses the issue of punts in bottles of sparkling wine, as bottles of still wine can be much weaker.4. It has a purpose for sparkling wines, aiding in the stacking of inverted bottles on top of each other. This explanation was suggested in The Oxford Companion to Wine (1st ed., p. 140), which states that this method of stacking is necessary (or at least very helpful) for traditional sparkling winemaking. I have no reason to believe that this use is untrue, but it may have originally been more of a serendipitous discovery than the result of a conscious design. Also, like #3, this reasoning doesn’t explain punts in bottles of still wine.5. Its purpose is to collect sediment to make the wine easier to decant. This certainly doesn’t explain punts in sparkling wines. Nor is it helped by the fact that there are some red wines which do not have punts. It may be useful for this purpose, but I doubt that sediment collection was the original reason for the design (again, it seems more likely to me that a use was found for something which already existed). I also doubt that it makes a signficant difference in the amount of wine which can be decanted easily. If anyone has done a relevant experiment, I’d be interested in the results.6. Its purpose is to aid in pouring the wine in an “elegant” fashion. In case you haven’t seen anyone do this, the idea is that you can pour wine by placing one hand on the base, holding onto the punt with your thumb. I seriously doubt that this is the purpose, as there seem to be just as many people who think this is awkward and pretentious as those who think it is elegant and sophisticated. However, a punt is undoubtedly useful if you want to pour wine this way.7. Its purpose is aesthetic and/or marketing-related:a. To make the bottle look bigger (mentioned in The Oxford Companion to Wine (1st ed.) as a possible reason for punts in still wines). Now we’re getting somewhere. While this may not have been the original purpose, I could see that current marketing and packaging gurus might appreciate the illusion of a bigger bottle.b. Because people expect to see a punt in “quality” wine, since they have always been there (somewhat related to reason #1 above). Again, this explanation may certainly be true, at least in some cases. Popular perception is certainly considered to be very important in sales of consumer goods.Conclusion:So, after all those possible explanations, what is the bottom line? Possibly, many or all of the above explanations contribute to the existence of punts in various wines; different producers may have slightly different reasons, and a single producer may even use different reasoning for having punts in bottles of different wines. Over the years, each one of these explanations has been proposed by at least one person on alt.food.wine as being the “one true reason” behind punts. Who can say that wine producers don’t hold opinions which are equally diverse as those of the wine-drinking public?Personally, I favor the idea that the punt was, at least at first, an accident of early glass-blowing technique. Over time punts probably proved useful for a number of reasons (bottle stability when standing, stacking sparkling wine), while not being strictly necessary. For most wines today, I believe that the reason for the punt is largely aesthetic. People expect to see punts in “quality” wines due to tradition, and the illusion of a larger bottle is probably useful for marketing. However, since nothing about the issue is truly clear, you should feel free to form your own conclusions.Last revised 3/17/01

To collect sediments in the wine. Some reds are aged in the bottle and the sediments sink and stay in the ridges, rather than swirl around when handled.

they probably want there product more special then other people or they want to cheat you out of your wine