Carrickfergus – Irish Folk Song -Celtic Guitar

Hello friends, this is a lovely Irish folk song called Carrickfergus; the origins of the song are unclear, but it has been traced to an Irish language song, “Do bhí bean uasal” (“There Was a Noblewoman”), which is attested to the poet Cathal Buí Mac Giolla Ghunna, who died in 1745 in Co. Clare. This arrangement is largely based on Glen Weiser’s and is played in DADGAD. More info on song (from Wiki): The Irish lyrics were about a man being cuckolded, a bawdy and humorous ditty. By contrast, the English lyrics are nostalgic. With the Industrial Revolution, a linen-trade developed between Co. Antrim (where Carrickfergus is situated), and Co. Cork. It is possible the English lyrics came from snatches picked up in interactions with the Ulstermen. In modern times, “Carrickfergus” became known after actor Peter O’Toole related it to Dominic Behan, who put it in print and made a recording in the mid-1960s. The middle verse was allegedly written by Behan. The song has been recorded by many well known performers including Declan Affley, Joan Baez, Dominic Behan, Charlotte Church, De Dannan, Joe Dassin (as Mon village du bout du monde), The Dubliners, Bryan Ferry, Brian Kennedy, Declan Galbraith, Irish Stew of Sindidun, Lisa Kelly, Loreena McKennitt, Órla Fallon, Van Morrison, Bryn Terfel, Van Morrison and the Chieftains, and Ronan Keating. The song is a popular request at folk festivals and concerts, and was played at the 1999 funeral of John F. Kennedy, Jr. The song was more

Download digital sheet music: Traditional Irish Folk Song: Carrickfergus, Brian Kennedy: Carrickfergus, Charlotte Church: Carrickfergus, Irish Folksong: Carrickfergus, Irish Folk Song: Carrickfergus (folklore) and play it off-line

Carrickfergus The Dubliners Jim McCann Acoustic Cover w/ Gibson J-200 & Bluesharp

“Carrickfergus” is an Irish folk song, named after the town of Carrickfergus in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The origins of the song are unclear, but it has been traced to an Irish language song, “Do bhí bean uasal” (“There Was a Noblewoman”), which is attested to the poet Cathal Buí Mac Giolla Ghunna, who died in 1745 in County Clare. The song appears on a ballad sheet in Cork City in the mid Nineteenth Century in macaronic form. The Irish lyrics were about a man being cuckolded, a bawdy and humorous ditty. By contrast, the English lyrics are nostalgic. With the Industrial Revolution, a linen-trade developed between Co. Antrim (where Carrickfergus is situated), and Co. Cork. It is possible the English lyrics came from snatches picked up in interactions with the Ulstermen. Robert Gogan suggests Carrickfergus may have evolved from at least two separate songs which would explain why it doesn’t have a consistent narrative. For example, the Ancient Music of Ireland, published by George Petrie in 1855, contained a song called The Young Lady which featured many but not all of the lyrics used in Carrickfergus. Gogan also refers to a recording of a song called Sweet Maggie Gordon which is kept in the Music for the Nation section of the US Library of Congress. It was published by Mrs Pauline Lieder in New York in 1880. It contains verses which are similar to Carrickfergus, but the chorus is closer to another Irish/Scottish folk song called Peggy Gordon. In modern times

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